Compensating Errors

The class had been given a sum to do, involving three positive whole numbers (‘positive’ here means ‘greater than zero). During the break, two classmates compared notes.

“Oops, I added the three numbers instead of multiplying them,” said George.

“You are lucky, then,” said Henrietta. “It’s the same answer either way.”

What were the three numbers? What would they have been if there had been only two of them, or four of them, again with their sum equal to their product?”

More later,

Nalin Pithwa

5 Comments

  1. pradeepselvaraju
    Posted October 20, 2015 at 10:16 am | Permalink | Reply

    The three numbers are 1,2 and 3 because-

    1 + 2 + 3 = 6
    1 x 2 x 3 = 6

    • Posted October 20, 2015 at 1:42 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Yes, but please solve the other cases also. Good keep it up!!

      • pradeepselvaraju
        Posted November 19, 2015 at 11:27 am | Permalink

        Yes sir….. For the twos it could be 2&2 as 2*2& 2+2=4
        I am not sure about the fours sir…… I could find the fives- 1,1,1,3,3
        1+1+1+3+3=9
        1*1*1*3*3=9

  2. Anubhav C. Singh
    Posted October 24, 2015 at 7:46 am | Permalink | Reply

    Two of them wold mean two twos (2+2 & 2*2)
    Four would mean one, one, two and eight (1+1+2+4=8=1*1*2*4)

    • Anubhav C. Singh
      Posted October 24, 2015 at 7:47 am | Permalink | Reply

      Four would mean one, one, two and four
      Typo in the last comment

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